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Who The Hell Are You?

Articles about blogging tipsWho are you? What do you do? What are you talking about? What will you be talking about? What gives you the right to talk about anything? What are you doing here? Why are you doing it here? Who the hell are you?

These are the many questions I ask myself when I visit a website or blog. I want to know who is the person behind the words, what are their qualifications, why are they bothering to waste their time and mine, and why should I trust anything they have to say.

Don’t you?

If you have a site or blog, take a moment RIGHT NOW to check and see if you have included an About and/or Contact Page on your blog or website. This single page can help people decide whether or not what you have to say is worth of reading and writing about and linking to. It doesn’t have to be your resume, but it needs to be something that gives us a clue as to who you are.

If you are using wordpress.com, the odds are high that the WordPress Theme you have chosen already features an About Page. Look in your sidebar or in the header for a link to About. If it is not there, you can add it by clicking Manage > Pages and adding an About Page of your own.

Part of the fun of blogging is anonymity. No one has to know who you are. But they do need to know something about you in order to trust what you say. You don’t have to use your real name. You don’t have to hand out your email address, or even the URL of other sites you run. What you choose to share is up to you. Just share a little bit about who you are and what makes you qualified so we can get a peek behind the mask of your blog and trust you just a little bit more.

It helps us to understand, too, what you are writing about. If you are writing about everything on the planet, then tell us that you are and tell us why. If your focus is very narrow, then share with us a little of the rationale and experience you have that qualifies you to write about this subject.

You got a blog because you had something you wanted people to read, and you work hard to get attention to your site through trackbacks, pings, search engine submissions, and spreading the word, so why not give a little attention to your blog and your qualifications.

RIGHT NOW, answer the question in your About page. Who the hell am I?

And to answer the question you are probably wondering yourself right now, who the hell are you?


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68 Comments

  1. Muse
    Posted September 28, 2005 at 3:10 pm | Permalink

    I totally agree on having a place that tells people who the hell you are. I tried to do mine justice…I guess if I get complaints I will know.

  2. Posted September 28, 2005 at 4:04 pm | Permalink

    I guess I have liked being anonymous up until now, but you’re right. People do deserve the chance to evaluate their sources. Your title really got my attention. I’ll make sure to complete my About page.

  3. Posted June 3, 2006 at 10:29 pm | Permalink

    Lorelle, I was referred to this post by Collin of blogreview.wordpress.com. Thanks for a nice write-up and in particular for explicitly spelling out that writing something about oneself need not mean totally compromising one’s privacy. Your site is a veritable treasure trove of blogging fundamentals, and I see myself coming here very often.

    Polaris.

  4. Posted June 4, 2006 at 12:47 am | Permalink

    Thank you, Polaris. And I thought that Collin’s review of your site was excellent. He made some very good points that will benefit everyone, including yourself. Good on you for risking yourself and your blog by opening it up for review. It shows you are serious about what you do and that you want to be the best you can.

    Thank you for your kind words and if there is a specific topic you would like to see covered, please ask. I feel that this is “your” blog as well as mine and I do my best to cover topics that you need.

  5. Posted June 4, 2006 at 12:59 pm | Permalink

    Hi Lorelle:

    Yes, there is an issue I would want to know your opinions about; something that I am uncertain about whenever I think of my blogroll. The question is this: “Am I supposed to ask before adding someone to my blogroll?”. In my google searches, I did not find much on this. Of course, there are some bloggers who post about the issue of asking people if *I* wish to be included in *their* blogroll. But, given the newness of my blog, that is a question than does not yet cross my mind.

    I am sure there have been cases where bloggers have regretted being added to someone’s blogroll. At the same time, there are bloggers who have an inviting “Blogroll Me!” link on their blogs. Is it best to just ask when in doubt, or is that overkill? If you’ve covered this before, please let me know about the link. And, I added you to my blogroll without asking, so please let me know if this is ok ;-).

    Polaris

  6. Posted June 4, 2006 at 1:50 pm | Permalink

    Good question, one that I thought would have been easily answered. So I will write about it. Thank you. But the short answer is, no, you don’t have to ask. And yes, you can include me. But it does bring up a bunch of other things to consider, so expect an article on this soon.

    Thank you!

  7. Posted June 6, 2006 at 2:19 am | Permalink

    Hi Lorelle,
    I just wanted to say thanks for the inspiration to smarten up the About page. Maybe I didn’t do it quite the way you meant, but hey at least it’s pointed. ;)

    Keep up the good work, your articles make for great reading and inspiration to those of us new to WordPress and the whole weblog experience !

  8. Posted June 6, 2006 at 9:36 am | Permalink

    There are no rules and regulations for an About page. All the reader asks is “let me know a little more about you than almost nothing”. ;-) I think fun and colorful About pages are great and I’ll be writing about them soon, so stay tuned.

    And thanks for the kind words.

  9. Posted July 23, 2006 at 10:48 am | Permalink

    Thank you, Lorelle, for writing this post. I believe in always choosing for readers and readers want a relationship with the writer so that they know how to take the message that is put in front of them.

    I wonder about the blog with an anonymous writer. What makes the writer want to hide?

  10. Posted July 23, 2006 at 6:06 pm | Permalink

    Funny, I never look at “About” pages unless what I’ve read piqued my interest in finding out where the blogger is from. I seldom look at the author info on a book jacket either, I read a few pages of the book to see if I want to read it. If it’s a riveting tale, than I want to know who the author is.

  11. Posted July 24, 2006 at 9:07 pm | Permalink

    Well, I’m the Blog Bloke, that’s who. If you don’t believe me check out my profile.

    Lorelle, didn’t you ask the Bloke for an interview about three years ago? My how time flies.

    Cheers!

    …BB

  12. Posted July 24, 2006 at 9:59 pm | Permalink

    Blog Bloke: No, I did not.

  13. Posted July 26, 2006 at 2:03 am | Permalink

    Oh yeah, sorry Lorelle I almost forgot. The title of this post was “Who The Hell Are You?”

  14. Posted November 19, 2006 at 11:18 am | Permalink

    I love the title for this topic, Who the hell are you. It made me smile as to how blunt it is. very cool. For those who are just starting out in the blogging world and trying to figure out how “the hell” to add text to your about page, you need to click on the tab that says “page” and select “edit” so you may add your info. I thought I’d share this bit of info in case new bloggers are struggling to find it. I hope this helps!

  15. Posted November 19, 2006 at 11:50 am | Permalink

    Thanks. Yes, I had fun with the title.

    And instructions for adding an About Page are in the article, but the technique is a little different depending upon your blogging platform. The instructions you’ve given and I’ve included are for WordPress.

  16. Posted January 27, 2007 at 8:32 am | Permalink

    Lorelle,

    A tad late to be replying to this, but sometimes the, “Who the hell are you” could be answered better by the content in the website (or the blog) more than an About page.

    Not that I don’t agree with the rest of what you had to say.

  17. Posted January 27, 2007 at 8:38 am | Permalink

    It’s never too late. ;-)

    Certainly, who you are should be reflected within your content, but what are the odds that every visitor to your site will stumble upon the exact post(s) that give them the information they need to know a little more about who you are and what you do and why they should care about what you have to say? Not very good.

    By featuring a very brief summary that answers these questions, and support it by your content, you make the job easier for everyone to help them get to know you.

    For example, if I find a post I want to link to, I want to know a little more about who I’m linking to. I’m going to look for an About page long before I search the blog for “who is this person”. And what are the odds you’ve included those particular keywords in your posts that will give me an answer? ;-)

    You can never go wrong if you provide both an About page and write so people “know you” through your writing.

  18. Jeff
    Posted January 27, 2007 at 9:30 pm | Permalink

    Lorelle, you mentioned that its okay not to list your real name in the About page. That’s fine and dandy, but lets suppose the blog grows really big (like yours) and even your friends or colleagues may very well stumble upon your blog, so assuming you use a fake name from the start… you’d be found out eventually and that isnt nice at all for me or for my readers.

    Even though, I’m really tempted to be an anonymous figure, cos that’s just my nature…how is it really possible to be anonymous if your blog grows big? Of course it doesnt matter, if your blog gets read by 30 people a month…;)

  19. Posted January 28, 2007 at 6:25 am | Permalink

    Marilyn Monroe, Rock Hudson, Stephan King, Agatha Christie, Lewis Carroll, L. Frank Baum, Carolyn Keene, and…well, I’d say that’s be a very good club to belong to, wouldn’t you? These are all people who used pen names, names different from their own, for various reasons and purposes.

    If your blog gets popular under a pen name, consider yourself lucky.

  20. Posted March 2, 2007 at 2:53 pm | Permalink

    Well I finally found a down to earth website, is that something.

  21. Posted June 22, 2007 at 2:02 pm | Permalink

    I think many people find it very difficult to write about themselves. I’ve got an article and free template called “How to Write a Short Bio” that makes it much easier. You can see the full template here…

    http://www.becomeacertifiedcoach.com/how_to_write_bio.htm

    or a mini-version titled “How to Write Your ‘About Me’ Page that was published oat Problogger.net…

    http://www.problogger.net/archives/2006/11/24/how-to-write-your-about-me-page/

    Hope the template makes the process less agonizing for folks!

  22. lavidaboca
    Posted July 26, 2007 at 1:25 pm | Permalink

    Finally! An explanation for how to bring back my ABOUT ME page that I inadvertently deleted. Obviously, I’m new at this. I received help through WordPress Support but I don’t think my question about losing my ABOUT ME page and the link on the main page was understood (which was most likely my fault). Your blog is most helpful. I’ll be back soon – so save me a seat.

  23. Posted October 3, 2007 at 2:43 am | Permalink

    I thought this too – I added my ‘about’ page ages ago – but neglected to update my contact information (after killing a few email addresses by the spam which inevitably accumulated) I have since added a contact form which shouldn’t get spammed, and have begun to get enquiries from all sorts of people (journalists etc).

    All these questions also made me write a post about everything I’ve done in the past few years, to which I can refer anyone who asks “and who the hell are you to be talking about XXXX” – it seems to do the job.

    Nice post – I’ve got to stop reading all yours and do some work on my own stuff ;).

    Rob

  24. Posted November 7, 2007 at 10:37 am | Permalink

    i love the first two paragraphs. my sentiments exactly.

  25. Posted June 27, 2008 at 6:34 am | Permalink

    Won’t the main part of your blog give an indication as to who you are?

  26. Posted June 27, 2008 at 8:58 am | Permalink

    @ Mauwie Wauwie:

    Define “main part” of your blog. Do you mean the front page? The header? The header and sidebar? The content area? EVERYTHING on your blog defines who you are but people choose pretty over common sense most of the time. The About page is a CV/Resume, a chance for you to really tell people who you are and what you blog about, and why the readers should trust what you blog. If you can find images and content that makes that point within less than 1 second, the About page is still a good fall back. :D

  27. King Fahd
    Posted August 30, 2008 at 10:55 am | Permalink

    I’ve got problem with “HOME page button doesnt exist” when i opne my website… izit becoz of the template itself or i can do something inside the dashboard to mak the “HOME page button” appear.. Thank you..

  28. Posted September 2, 2008 at 12:07 pm | Permalink

    @ King Fahd:

    I don’t know anything about your site, so I can’t give you specifics. A “home” link is any link that goes to the first, welcoming page of your site. If you didn’t put one in, or the design you are using doesn’t add one automatically, you do so manually. Most designers have the header logo be clickable to the front page of the site. If you are using WordPress, see Creating a Clickable Header in Your WordPress Theme for tips.

    If your problem is that you have a home page link and it reports “Page Not Found” or 404 Page Error, you have a different problem. The link isn’t going to or finding your site’s front page. That’s a technical issue and if you are using WordPress, check with the WordPress Support Forums. If you aren’t, start digging into the underlying code and find out why.

  29. Posted September 12, 2008 at 5:17 pm | Permalink

    Considering the information I place on the site is strongly thought to be responsible for three key figures showing up dead I like my anonymity.
    Also anyone that goes around “who the hell this and who the hell that” sound like they have one big chip on their shoulder and considering I could care less what most mortals think. I think I’ll stay behind the scenes…

  30. Posted September 12, 2008 at 9:27 pm | Permalink

    @ reginald cottle:

    I’m not sure I understand your point. If you would like to stay anonymous, then stay that way. That’s not the point of this article. The point is to provide an About page, which your blog has, that tells people what you are blogging about, why you are blogging, and some qualifications, if necessary. It’s to stress the importance of an About page. It isn’t about putting yourself or anyone else at risk.

    By writing a blog, you are not staying behind the scenes, too much. You are making a public statement. Your words, and your About page, provide more information to back that public statement. You’ve done an okay job with yours.

  31. Posted February 1, 2009 at 4:52 am | Permalink

    ahmed abdelfattah ali ahmed

  32. Robert Fay
    Posted April 5, 2009 at 12:54 am | Permalink

    Dear Lorelle,

    The obviousness of your insights were MUCH needed for me. The About page will explain to people ‘who’ I am – and more importantly – ‘why’ I am, or rather why I have been forced to be ‘what’ I am. You are ever so right, that will give people some semblance of trust for what I will be writing about on the above blog and the services I will be offering. Thank you. Respectfully your, Robert Fay

  33. Posted April 5, 2009 at 12:56 am | Permalink

    Sorry, Lorelle, I noticed the “notify me of follow up comments via email” just as I hit the Post Comment bar – and then checked it and ‘posted’ again. Please feel invited to correspond.
    Respectfully yours,
    Robert Fay

  34. Posted May 10, 2009 at 10:48 pm | Permalink

    Hello

    I have created two pages on my website

    video-laugh and About us ( default is home)

    i wanted to add post or videos in video-laugh page

    but was not able , Whatever i have added was posted to home page

    i want to post in video-laugh page can anyone help me out please

    i am using wordpress please its urgent

    • Posted May 11, 2009 at 6:01 am | Permalink

      I don’t know why you can’t add video. If you are using a WordPress blog, you can use video in any Page or Post if you have the right embed code. Check the WordPress Support Forums for more specific help.

  35. Mark
    Posted May 20, 2009 at 7:26 pm | Permalink

    Hi, i respect your advice, however, you are a little blunt…
    Who are you? What do you do? What are you talking about? What will you be talking about? What gives you the right to talk about anything? What are you doing here? Why are you doing it here? Who the hell are you?

    If I am spending my money and my time to host, administer and write on a blog site, then why should I be so accountable to answer these questions? I do not charge people to read, and i do not currently monetize my site.

  36. sumansindhu
    Posted September 10, 2009 at 2:42 am | Permalink

    What is RSS feed. I want to create my own website in wordpress and add RSS. can you tell me how can I do that.

  37. Stephen
    Posted November 29, 2009 at 7:53 pm | Permalink

    Why would I believe what is written on the “About” page if the person is not willing to use their true identity? If they live behind an alias, why wouldn’t they also publish an alias “about” page? I certainly wouldn’t believe it. Thanks for your advice, though. I certainly see your point in the case of real people who are not afraid to stand by what they publish.

  38. Posted December 28, 2009 at 8:26 am | Permalink

    Thank you, great advice about the About Us page! I have a somewhat related question since it also addresses the “who the hell are you?” issue. For wordpress sites for services businesses such as consulting, where people make the decision to go further based on their comfort level with their understanding of who “you” are, is it more appropriate to use as a home page a static page that highlights who you are, and maybe a few key posts that support it, verses the default blog home page of posts, since your latest (and thus most visible posts) may be highly specific in nature and not suitable as an introduction to your services?

  39. Steve
    Posted February 23, 2010 at 4:21 pm | Permalink

    Nice argument, but I will remain anonymous on the web.

    As an individual, no one cares who I am. They do care about the information I may provide, and the veracity of that may be ascertained by the references I provide to backup my claims. Good references at least shows I am suitably informed, and the information reliable. Whether the theses I may be expounding are viable is for the reader to judge.

    Opinions, of course, are different; they are mine, and I really don’t care whether others agree with me or not. Opinions are conversation starters, and are open to alteration in the right circumstances. Thus they do not require people to know who I am in order for them to have opinions about my opinions.

    For the record, I am Steve… and that’s all you need to know.

  40. Posted April 24, 2010 at 2:46 pm | Permalink

    Hi there,

    When I read this post, I realized that those questions are the ones that I make to any author of blog, book, article, etc. in the moment I read their work.

    Then I went to my website and put myself in a reader’s place to see how much would I trust in my website considering the amount of information that I had int he ‘About me’ page. I would definitively go away if I were a reader.

    I have updated my ‘About Me’ page with enough information to inspire some confidence in any reader that results to be as skeptical as me when it comes about *nix like Operative Systems articles, recommendations, etc.

    Great article!!!, Thank you.

  41. Posted May 30, 2010 at 12:50 am | Permalink

    Thanks for this post, I am going to update my about me page now and make it more interesting and welcoming, Sally :)

  42. Posted August 8, 2010 at 8:06 am | Permalink

    Hi, my english is little, I have a pair a questions:
    1.- I do 3 page and show it in my blog, I want create a sub-levels for mi principals pages, my actual theme don’t permited this option, Is there any option to configure directly Wpress? , I used WP 3.0.1
    2.- I need create page “Terms and Conditions” in my blog feet, What I need to do..

    Thanks..

  43. Posted August 31, 2010 at 12:32 pm | Permalink

    Thanks for the tips. Unique layout btw.

  44. john goodwin
    Posted March 16, 2011 at 6:23 pm | Permalink

    I always thought they wanted me to put in personnel information, age,sex,address etc., But after reading your article I fully understand and will be doing mine pronto. Thanks John

  45. Nathan REN
    Posted March 20, 2011 at 9:03 pm | Permalink

    I like this topic,visiter will get more information from”about us”,”contact us”pages,these information will let visiter trust your website information.

  46. Affordsol
    Posted April 6, 2011 at 6:10 am | Permalink

    Hello,

    Its ok to have an “About” page, but how can I:

    1) Change that horrible menu with white letters on black background to blue letters on grey blackground ??

    2) Have the “About” page on my Right sided menu bar ??

    Thanks to all,

    affordsol

    • Posted April 6, 2011 at 5:31 pm | Permalink

      If you need help changing the look and feel of your site’s design, contact the Theme author or find someone experienced in web design to make the changes. The comment box is not the place for a full lessons in CSS and web design. Good luck with your site.

  47. silence
    Posted April 21, 2011 at 5:37 am | Permalink

    Excuse me, how do I do a contact on copyright, such as a page? I am a novice, your comments! WordPress backstage how didn’t this can set the page? Feel very inconvenient oh!

    • Posted April 21, 2011 at 9:23 pm | Permalink

      To create a contact or copyright Page in WordPress, go to Pages > Create New and then type in whatever contact information and copyright information you wish to have there. For copyright information, please see Jonathan Bailey of Plagiarism Today.

  48. Posted July 7, 2011 at 4:40 am | Permalink

    If you don’t have to write your real name why should someone believe you. The content is more important than “who the hell are you?”. If I am a Chinese guy then probably I won’t be so successful like a German one or an American. Personally, I read 20 seconds and if I like I keep reading. I take a look on what I can find on that website and I will decide if I bookmark it or not. “Who the hell are you?” is not so important for me.

    Dan Dumitrache – Romania-Vietnam

    • Posted July 7, 2011 at 9:28 am | Permalink

      Wow, I just don’t know where to begin with this. First, when you write on the web, no one knows your ethnicity, though if you use your real name it might bring up some judgements but what’s in a name after all. What you seem to be missing is that you shouldn’t believe everything you read and knowing a little something about the person’s expertise, relevant information to the topic, helps to qualify their judgement, expertise, and the trust you have in what they say. If you just judge everything by the surface, that says a lot about more about you than them. I don’t “bookmark” as that is archaic. If I find something I enjoy by someone, odds are I will want to know more. The point of this article is to help people understand how to deliver the more.

  49. Posted August 10, 2011 at 4:22 am | Permalink

    Great advice for will point all my clients here that grumble at a bio or about us page being in the site.

  50. Antonio Casagrande
    Posted September 8, 2011 at 2:30 pm | Permalink

    Hello, Lorelle VanFossen …

    I came to you through Google / New To WordPress – Where to begin.

    I am a nobody trying to stop being information. I am amazed by their objectivity in explicit words. It is a joy, I found a treasure in your link.

    Thank you for you there
    Antonio Casagrande.:

    • Posted September 8, 2011 at 8:00 pm | Permalink

      You are welcome. It’s important to protect your privacy, of course, but letting the world know enough to trust you and your contribution to the web is also most important.

  51. Wim
    Posted January 28, 2012 at 11:06 am | Permalink

    So who the hell are you Lorella?

    You write a great story about letting people know who you are and what qualifies you to write what you are writing. Yet what you preach, you do not practice.

    I would have thought that on a post like this, the first thing you would, or should, have done was to add that all important “About” page and place it in a prominent postion. I believe that to start with would have lent a lot more credibility to what you are saying.

    Should I believe you?

    After all, who the hell are you and what gives you the right to write this article?

    Kind regards,
    Wim

    • Posted January 29, 2012 at 4:19 pm | Permalink

      Check the last link in the post. And thank you for your forthright concern about my integrity.

  52. Posted February 25, 2012 at 3:08 pm | Permalink

    Wow, all the way back to 2005!

    • Posted February 25, 2012 at 9:48 pm | Permalink

      And this is amazing because…? I’ve been at this since before 1994. :D

    • Posted February 26, 2012 at 6:04 am | Permalink

      Well then I guess 2005 ain’t nuthin aye!

    • Posted February 26, 2012 at 2:13 pm | Permalink

      Ah, it’s the fact that the post was published in 2005. LOL! I didn’t get what you meant by the reference. Thanks.

    • Carthagod
      Posted June 4, 2012 at 1:48 am | Permalink

      Yep, 2005, that was quite another Internet era already :) I think the notion of identity on the web has evolved quite a lot since then, the way people blog and share on the web in general also. I think it’s becoming more and more crucial to be able to trace back the source of an idea, but unfortunately the way things have evolved doesn’t help this so much. Did you ever wonder on the way a blog article can follow, reblogged and modified, commented and twitted, facebooked and shared, remodified and reread. It gets sometimes really hard now to assign an author to an idea, you don’t just look at the back of the cover anymore. Should there be a sort of “sticky about me” ?

    • Posted June 4, 2012 at 12:44 pm | Permalink

      Actually, nothing has changed when it comes to identifying yourself on the web. The “sticky about me” is your blog or website, not your social media placeholder. Those are placeholders not permanent addresses, so to speak. Your permanent address is the way people should be able to track you back to your source: you. Where you control the conversation and introduce yourself. It’s more important than ever to have a clear identity on the web, which is why I created a complement series to this article called Prove it.

  53. Posted April 16, 2012 at 2:30 am | Permalink

    Reblogged this on Out of Date and commented:
    hmm.. i already thought about that. I just dont see it coming to me. Who am I? About me? I’m just new to this blogging stuff. Right now, im practicing step by step tutorial how to make a nice blog, and to know everybody who am i. But for now, I’m very half way of it. Will this be considerable? :) But Ms. Lorelle, thank you for the advice.;) Godbless yah!

    • Posted April 16, 2012 at 11:05 am | Permalink

      I also recommend you check out my Prove it article series as the first few articles dive deeper into how to write a better bio for your website.


101 Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. [...] Exploring WordPress Features: WordPress has some very powerful features that make blogging a dream, and makes WordPress a borderline CMS program. In fact, many use it as such. Pages are not like posts. They are non-chronological web pages that work outside of the WordPress Loop and do not “age”. Use them to create contact, about, events, schedule, and other non-post pages that provide pseudo static information. [...]

  2. [...] We Don’t Know Who You Are: I might love what you have to say, but if I don’t know who you are, how you came to be this expert, or why I should respect what you have to say, you’ve lost my interest. I don’t want your life story. I don’t even care where you live, though that seems to be important to a lot of people. I don’t even have to know your real name. What I do want to know is some background, resume references, and qualifications that make me want to trust what you have to write. If I need verification on who you are and your expertise, I’ll find it myself or ask, but until then, at least write me an About page that gives a clue as to why I should care about what you have to say. [...]

  3. [...] Lorelle got me staying up a bit more, writing a detailed profile ‘cuz I stumbled upon her exellent piece about blogging. She’s so right. Who are you? What do you do? What are you talking about? What will you be talking about? What gives you the right to talk about anything? What are you doing here? Why are you doing it here? Who the hell are you? [...]

  4. [...] I’ve talked a lot about helping your readers get to know you, and this might be one of the ways to blog anonmyous while personalizing the experience. You can be a “web database expert blogging from San Diego, California” or “opinionated bastard from Edmondton, Alberta, Canada” and still be secretive about who you are. [...]

  5. [...] http://lorelle.wordpress.com/2005/09/28/who-the-hell-are-you/ [...]

  6. [...] To give you a head’s up, here are a few redundant things he has said so far in his blog reviews you need to know about so you can clean up your act before he reviews your blog: For the second time in two posts I’m going to start with a question. Who are you? In Mirkwood’s review I linked to Lorelle’s post called Who The Hell Are You. Please go have a read and see if it makes sense. All the reader really knows about you before they dive in (maybe) to your posts is your name. [...]

  7. [...] I was reading an old posting by Lorelle the other day, and realised that although I had an About page, it was not very descriptive or helpful. [...]

  8. [...] Be Personal Without Being Personal: Sedition.com said we don’t need a graphic to tell us what mood you are in. Exactly right. Nor do we need to know what music you were listening to at the moment you wrote whatever you wrote. Unless you are selling the music, and you are writing about the music you are listening to, we’re really not interested. We want to know about you, the blogger, your expertise and perspective, but we don’t want to know that you just had a cup of coffee or went to the toilet or anything else along that kind of personal and private information unless the topic at hand is the coffee or public restroom. [...]

  9. [...] ’nuff said? [...]

  10. [...] Inspired by Lorelle’s article Who The Hell Are You I grabbed a text widget and added an “About Me’ to my sidebar. After trying to get things aligned, formatted, and adding a few links I started thinking a widget might be nice for this. I had not seen anything like this around, so here it is, my first widget. [...]

  11. The Case for Anonymous Blogging

    Having been in politics and the legal profession I admit that I was concerned about the repercussions of blogging. But I have another reason that I would also like to offer…

  12. [...] I’ve written about how to let people know more about who you are so they understand who is behind the scenes of your blog. I’ve also challenged you to write about what you really know and are considered an expert in, giving you a chance to brag. Now it’s time for a different kind of Blogging Challenge. [...]

  13. [...] The absence of an ‘About‘ page is one of Collin’s pet hates and Lorelle also thinks they are very important. [...]

  14. [...] Pli malfrue mi plenigis mian prian paĝon, kiel la blogero fare de Lorelle, Kiu ajn estas vi?, kaj blogeroj fare de aliuloj konsilas. Do, ĉu ĝi sufiĉe bonas? Ĉu mi bezonos pli da informoj pri mi antaŭ ol ĝi estos leginda kaj komentinda? Kia speco de informoj? Ĉu aŭ mi nur estas seninteresa? Komentoj (0) | Reenaĵoj (0) [...]

  15. [...] The About Page is the most popular Page most people make, a Page that lets people know who you are and why you are blogging, setting a purpose for your blog. [...]

  16. [...] Feb 6 at 4:37 am by Lorelle VanFossen – In “Who The Hell Are You?”, I encouraged bloggers to fill out their About page on their blogs with information about who they [...]

  17. [...] if anyone wanted to know who I am, he or she would just read my blog. But I read Lorelle’s “Who the Hell Are You?” and realized the importance of writing the About page. So there it is [...]

  18. [...] written similar things such as Are You Who You Blog You Are? and Who The Hell Are You?, but this is the first time I laid down tips to help you choose a blogging persona, the person who [...]

  19. [...] Who the Hell Are You? by Lorelle VanFossen [...]

  20. [...] Who the Hell Are You? by Lorelle VanFossen [...]

  21. [...] I’m particularly fond of the About Page point. [...]

  22. [...] attracting a lot of traffic. More importantly, it helps us understand a little more about you and who you are. It also may help you to stop and take stock on what motivates and changed you in your [...]

  23. [...] Highlight achievements, expertise, education, training, and experiences in your blog posts. [...]

  24. [...] Who the Hell Are You? by Lorelle VanFossen [...]

  25. [...] Page: More than anything on your blog, your blog’s About page cements the first impression with information on the blog’s purpose and intent, as well as [...]

  26. [...] Page: More than anything on your blog, your blog’s About page cements the first impression with information on the blog’s purpose and intent, as well as the [...]

  27. [...] Page: More than anything on your blog, your blog’s About page cements the first impression with information on the blog’s purpose and intent, as well as [...]

  28. [...] Page: More than anything on your blog, your blog’s About page cements the first impression with information on the blog’s purpose and intent, as well as [...]

  29. [...] contact them on their blogs. Among them was Lorelle who when she visited luckily didn’t ask Who the Hell are you?, but instead struck up a conversation despite not knowing the first thing about me or this blog [...]

  30. [...] blog design with no fluff and muss, then skip the blog description, but make sure you have a good About page to help your visitors learn more about who you are and why you blog. Digg [...]

  31. [...] Page: More than anything on your blog, your blog’s About page cements the first impression with information on the blog’s purpose and intent, as well as the [...]

  32. [...] your Pages visible with a well-written About Page, contact, and other information that helps the reader known more about who you are and what you are [...]

  33. [...] on the community aspect in particular. She is very personal, and ends all of her posts with an authentic signature. If a similarly unique touch would lighten up your blog, go for [...]

  34. [...] The “About” Page is usually called “About” not “Things You Need To Know About Us”, “Who Am I” or “Want More Info”. [...]

  35. [...] Your About Page: The blogosphere GOT IT! Yeah! Bloggers now understand the importance of an About Page on their blog and how many people click it within the first group of clicks on a blog. Readers want [...]

  36. [...] The absence of an ‘About’ page is one of Collin’s pet hates and Lorelle also thinks they are very important. While I agree that background information about the author may be interesting and contact details [...]

  37. [...] on a blog. The argument is that, with an About page you are able to communicate to blog visitors who you the blogger are and what your blog is about. With a well crafted About page, that describes the remarkable benefits [...]

  38. [...] Well, I have a purpose for this blog; I’m going to blog about WordPress and anything between. If you have a clear purpose like me, go ahead to Options and add this purpose to your tagline. If you don’t have clear purpose, just empty the tagline field. Your blog will never be ‘Just another WordPress.com blog”. Your blog is unique. The next thing to do is to write an about page. Who are you, why did you make this blog, where do you live (if it matters) and probably the most important; why can you write about this topic. [...]

  39. [...] subscription buttons and book article advertisements littered throughout. After reading her article Who the hell are you? I began looking for her “About” section. Because it was hidden in the ridiculously long [...]

  40. [...] Related reading: Lorelle on WordPress – Who the h*ll are you? [...]

  41. [...] that work outside of the WordPress Loop and do not “age”. Use them to create contact, about, events, schedule, and other non-post pages that provide pseudo static [...]

  42. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  43. [...] Who the Hell Are You? by Lorelle VanFossen [...]

  44. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  45. [...] subscription buttons and book article advertisements littered throughout. After reading her article Who the hell are you? I began looking for her “About” section. Because it was hidden in the ridiculously long [...]

  46. [...] Who are you? What do you do? What are you talking about? What will you be talking about? What gives you the right to talk about anything? What are you doing here? Why are you doing it here? — Lorelle VanFossen in Who The Hell Are You? [...]

  47. [...] came here to learn. I’ll tell you about who I am and why you should trust what I have to say, important criteria for an About page, but it’s not important for you to know if I’m white, black, or whatever. It’s [...]

  48. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  49. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  50. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  51. [...] Who The Hell Are You? « Lorelle on WordPress [...]

  52. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  53. [...] that defines who you are, what you do, and why you are active online is your blog and its about page. No matter where you go on the web, your blog should be your home base, your business card, resume, [...]

  54. [...] Pages are for content such as About Me, Contact Me, Legal Information, Company Information, etc. Pages are often used to present information about your company or your site that is somehow timeless — information that is always applicable. You can use Pages to organize and manage any amount of content. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an About page and a Contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  55. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  56. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  57. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  58. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  59. [...] Pages are for content such as “About Me,” “Contact Me,” etc. Pages live outside of the normal blog chronology, aren’t included in your RSS feed. They’re often used to present information about yourself or your site that is somehow timeless — information that is always applicable. You can use Pages to organize and manage any amount of content. Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an About page and a Contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  60. [...] Who the Hell Are You? by Lorelle VanFossen [...]

  61. [...] Thought it would be a good idea to add a Contact page after reading Who The Hell Are You? by Lorelle.  Still need to work a bit on expanding my About page.  I’d like to beef that up [...]

  62. [...] Instrukcja jak zrobić fajną stronę About us http://lorelle.wordpress.com/2005/09/28/who-the-hell-are-you/ [...]

  63. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  64. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  65. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  66. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  67. [...] Pages are for content such as “About Me,” “Contact Me,” etc. Pages live outside of the normal blog chronology, aren’t included in your RSS feed. They’re often used to present information about yourself or your site that is somehow timeless — information that is always applicable. You can use Pages to organize and manage any amount of content. Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an About page and a Contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  68. [...] 常见页面包括的内容还有:版权,相关法律信息,转载许可,公司信息及可访性声明。(顺带提一下,最好建立一个介绍页面和提供联系方式的页面 — 可以参看一下Lorelle给出的相关建议。) [...]

  69. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  70. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  71. [...] the author page into an about page with some creative and interesting information and facts to make the author appealing, trustworthy, [...]

  72. [...] on most WordPress Themes that the blog is hosted and authored by only one author, and that their About Page will provide the information the reader needs to learn more about the brilliance behind the blog. [...]

  73. [...] Who The Hell Are You? [...]

  74. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  75. [...] “Who the Hell Are You?” by Lorrelle [...]

  76. [...] and Cons of Using a Pseudonym or Pen Name » Who The Hell Are You? « Lorelle on WordPress Who The Hell Are You? « Lorelle on WordPress.VN:F [1.9.11_1134]please wait…Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)VN:F [1.9.11_1134]Rating: 0 (from 0 [...]

  77. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  78. [...] key page on the site is your About Page, the biography that showcases who you are, what you do, and how you do it, telling people of your [...]

  79. [...] Who the Hell Are You? by Lorelle VanFossen [...]

  80. [...] the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) In general, Pages are very similar to Posts in that they both have Titles and Content and can use [...]

  81. [...] You Are: You may have kept your Facebook and LinkedIn profile pages updated, but what about your About Page? Join me in my Prove It Campaign this year to update your About page and bio and make improvements [...]

  82. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  83. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  84. [...] Other examples of common pages include Copyright, Legal Information, Reprint Permissions, Company Information, and Accessibility Statement. (By the way, it’s a good idea to always have an about page and a contact page — see this advice from Lorelle.) [...]

  85. [...] Who The Hell Are You? [...]

  86. [...] Who The Hell Are You? [...]

  87. [...] How to Write an About Page [...]

  88. […] Who The Hell Are You? […]

  89. […] blog from other sites or search engines. I believe that every blogger should share a little about who they are and what they are doing with their blog to help the reader respect their writing and feel a personal connection with the […]

  90. […] Who the Hell Are You? […]

  91. […] design” or “writing”. Others took more time and thought. My article called “Who The Hell Are You” was in WordPress Tips and reminded you to create an “About” Page on your blog. Creating […]

  92. […] cloud, lists of recent or related posts? Do you have a site map or index? Can they easily find out who you are, what the purpose and goal of the blog is, and how to contact […]

  93. […] through the quarter, Jen will be giving you instructions regarding developing your blogs– the About Page, Categories versus Tags, the Contact page, how to comment on the blogs, […]

  94. […] Who The Hell Are You? […]

  95. […] What Makes You Special blog exercise links to Who the Hell Are You? and both got me to thinking, not only about who I am, but who I am today and who people perceive me […]

  96. […] put it on your site. You can put it on your About Page, the bio that defines who you are, what you do, and why we should trust you on this site, your […]

  97. […] What Makes You Special? blog exercise links to Who the Hell Are You? and both got me to thinking, not only about who I am, but who I am today and who people perceive me […]

  98. […] What Makes You Special? blog exercise links to Who the Hell Are You? and both got me to thinking, not only about who I am, but who I am today and who people perceive me […]

  99. […] through the quarter, Jen will be giving you instructions regarding developing your blogs including the About Page, Categories versus Tags, the Contact Page, how to comment on the blogs, and how to participate in […]

  100. […] them in your post content. Show them with a quick bio in the sidebar. Define yourself fully on your About Page. Let every pixel on the site, from the header art and background color or design to the words on […]

  101. […] Who The Hell Are You? – Lorelle on WordPress […]

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