Skip navigation

Full Disclosure on Corporate and Commercial Blogs

The Blogging Journalist showcases the Dan Gillmor on Bloggers and Disclosure:

It should go without saying that the bloggers should make this disclosure, right? No question, the ones who parrot a company line — down to using the company’s words — ought to be more forthcoming about the connections.

It should also go without saying, in that case, that newspapers (typically small ones) should not reprint press releases verbatim or nearly verbatim, at least not without disclosure. Yet some do, and the New York Times rarely (if ever) beats up on them.

And it should go without saying that TV stations shouldn’t use footage from “video news releases? (VNRs) without noting the video’s origins. Yet they do.

Most of all, though, it’s worth noting that people involved with stories, or their paid personnel, constantly talk with pro journalists. Now they talk with interested bloggers and others in the “new media? world. It’s part of the influencing and journalism processes, but it’s getting larger and to some degree messier.

I’d guess that most professionals realize they shouldn’t pass off other people’s work as their own. And the difference between advocacy and straight-up reporting, while sometimes less clean than we might like, is not a total mystery.

What do you think?

There are several questions issued here. Do you think there should be full disclosure for bloggers who blog for others? If a blogger is blogging for corporations and for commercial profit, should you be told? Should you, the reader, be told that you are reading something that isn’t “blog freedom of speech” but a controlled blogging substance? How should you be told? How should this information be presented? Should presentation of this information be regulated in some consistent fashion like the copyright laws?

The other question brought up is giving credit where credit is due and not stealing content. Content theft is wrong, and those who do the work should get the credit, but how far does this go? Some news articles are now filled with biographies of all who contributed to the final result. I just blockquoted the article, and included a link to the source, but how much can you quote before you cross the line and make the work more yours than theirs? Even with linked source credits?

There are a lot of “shoulds” in the above blockquote. When should these “shoulds” become “musts” and possibly laws and rules?

Related Articles


Site Search Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Copyright Lorelle VanFossen

10 Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. […] Full Disclosure on Corporate and Commercial Blogs […]

  2. […] Full Disclosure on Corporate and Commercial Blogs […]

  3. […] Full Disclosure on Corporate and Commercial Blogs […]

  4. […] Full Disclosure on Corporate and Commercial Blogs […]

  5. […] Full Disclosure on Corporate and Commercial Blogs […]

  6. […] Full Disclosure on Corporate and Commercial Blogs […]

  7. […] Full Disclosure on Corporate and Commercial Blogs […]

  8. […] Full Disclosure on Corporate and Commercial Blogs […]

  9. […] Full Disclosure on Corporate and Commercial Blogs […]

  10. […] Full Disclosure on Corporate and Commercial Blogs […]

Post a Comment

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 21,252 other followers

%d bloggers like this: